Thursday, April 12, 2007

An Easter Story!


Hey Guys!
Its Easter once again which means we are already into a quarter of the year.(God! Was that fast!). I dont know about you but sometimes i feel like slowing time down maybe because i havnt been able to do all i had planned to by this time of the year.
Any way, i guess there is still time to achieve them cos as the saying goes-"When there is life, there is hope". Its great enough that we are alive to experience yet another easter.
For those of us who are Christians, Easter is a period to celebrate the death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, a triumph of good over evil. It is a time to show love to the less fortunate amongst us and forgiveness to those who have offended us- the kind of love and mercy that was shown to us by christ who died on the cross for our sins.
I am going to share a story with you all. This story touched me and i hope it makes some meaning to you too.

THE RICH FAMILY IN CHURCH by Eddie Ogan.


I’II never forget Easter 1946. I was 14, my little sister Ocy was 12, and my older sister Darlene, 16. We lived at home with our mother, and the four of us knew what it was to do without man y things. My dad had died five years before, leaving Mom with seven school kids to raise and no money. By 1946 my older sisters were married and my brothers had left home.

A month before Easter the pastor of our church announced that a special Easter offering would be taken to help poor family. He asked everyone to save and give sacrificially.

When we got home, we talked about what we could do. We decided to buy 50 pounds of potatoes and live on them for a month. This would allow us to save $20 of our grocery money for the offering. When we thought that if we kept our electric lights turned out as much as possible and didn’t listen to the radio, we’d save money on that month’s electric bill. Darlene got many house and yard cleaning jobs as possible, and both of us babysat for everyone we could. For 15 cents we could buy enough cotton loops to make three potholders to sell for $1. We made $20 on potholders.

That month was one of the best of our lives. Every day we counted the money to see how much we had saved. At night we’d sit in the dark and talk about how the poor family was going to enjoy having money the church will give them. We had about 80 people in church, so we figured that whatever amount of money we had to give, the offering would surely be 20 times that much. After all, every Sunday the Pastor had reminded everyone to save for the sacrificial offering.

The day before Easter, Ocy and I walked to the grocery store and got the manager to give us three crisp $20 bills and one $10 bill for all our change. We ran all the way home to show mum and Darlene. We had never had so much money before. That night we were so excited we could hardly sleep. We didn’t care that we wouldn’t have new clothes for Easter; we had $70 for the sacrificial offering. We could hardly wait to get to church!

On Sunday morning, rain was pouring. We didn’t own an umbrella, and was over a mile from our home, but it didn’t seem to matter how wet we got. Darlene had cardboard in her shoes to fill the holes. The cardboard came apart, and her feet got wet. But we sat in church proudly. I heard some teenagers talking about the Smith girls having on their old dresses. I looked at them in their new clothes and I felt rich. When the sacrificial offering was taken, we were sitting on the second row from the front. Mum put in the $10 bill and each of us kids put in a $20. As we walked home after church, we sang all the way.

At lunch Mom had a surprise for us. She had bought a dozen eggs, and we had boiled Easter eggs with our fried potatoes! Late that afternoon the minister drove up in his car. Mom went to the door, talked with him for a moment, and then came back with an envelope in her hand. We asked what it was, but she didn’t say a word. She opened the envelope and out fell a bunch of money. There were three crisp $20 bills, one $10 and seventeen $1 bills. Mom put the money back in the envelope.

We didn’t talk, just sat and stared at the floor. We had gone from feeling like millionaires to feeling like poor white trash. We kids had such a happy life that we felt sorry for anyone who didn’t have our Mom and Dad for parents and a house full of brothers and sisters and other kids visiting constantly. We thought it was fun to share silverware and see whether we got the spoon or the fork that night. We had two knifes that we passed round to whoever needed them. I knew we didn’t have a lot of things that other people had, but I’d never thought we were poor.

That Easter day I found out we were.

The minister had brought us the money for the poor family, so we must be poor. I didn’t like being poor. I looked at my dress and worn-out shoes and felt so ashamed I didn’t even want to go back to church. Everyone there probably already knew we were poor! I thought about school. I was in the ninth grade and at the top of my class of over 100 students. I wondered if the kids at school knew that we were poor. I decided that I could quit school since I had finished the eight grade. That was all the law required at that time. We sat in silence for a long time. Then it got dark, and we went to bed. All that week, we girls went to school and came home, and no one talked much. Finally on Saturday, mom asked us what we wanted to do with the money. What did poor people do with money? We didn’t know. We’d never known we were poor.

We didn’t want to go to church on Sunday, but Mom said we had to. Although it was a sunny day, we didn’t talk on the way. Mom stared to sing, but no one joined in and she only sang one verse. At church we had a missionary speaker. He talked about how churches in Africa made buildings out of sun-dried bricks, but they needed money to buy roofs. He said $100 would put a roof on a church. The minister said, “Can’t we all sacrifice to help these poor people?” we looked at each other and smiled for the first time in a week. Mom reached into her purse and pulled out the envelope. She passed it to Darlene. Darlene gave it to me and I handed it to Ocy. Ocy put it in the offering.

When the offering was counted, the minister announced that it was little over $100.

The missionary was excited. He hadn’t expected such a large offering from our small church. He said, “You must have some rich people in this church.”

Suddenly it struck us! We had given $87 of that “little over &100.” We were rich family in the church! Hadn’t the missionary said so? From that day on I’ve never been poor again. I’ve always remembered how rich I am because I have Jesus!

Have a happy Easter everyone and remember we are rich as long as we have Jesus in our lives.
Princess.

5 comments:

chidi said...

awwww, the story is so cuute!! it shows us that we might not be rich in wordly ways but in the lord we are rich because weare his people. Happy belated easter ! Thanks for stopping by my blog & thanks for recommending my blog! its well appreciated. i will add you to my blog roll

princess said...

Chidi,No sweat dear. Am kinda new to this blog stuff and i appreciate ur comment. Thanks for the thot.

Sparkle said...

WOW, I just found out about the blog
that story, really inspiring
one can learn alot from it, well I can.
and its true, once we have jesus, we have everything.
nice blog, thanks for sharing.

princess said...

Thanks Sparkle, glad u learnt something from the story.

confused child said...

awwww dis is so touching.